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Yasukuni Shrine – 3 what did they die for? August 13, 2010

Posted by TAMAGAWABOAT in Blogroll, History, Japan, Japanese, Nanking Massacre, Rape of Nanking, WW2, Yasukuni.
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I watched a YouTube’s video that a Canadian named Pierre Pariseau said rude words against Tamogami Toshio (the former COS of Air Self-Defense Force ) and made a small trouble in Yasukuni Shrine on August 15th last year,  the 64th anniversary of the end of the Pacific War (=the Greater East Asian War).  Pierre Pariseau suddenly and provocatively said to Tamogami Toshio who finished his speech and was being interviewed by a cable television, “You would be arrested for unconstitutional if you were German. What do you think?”  A few Japanese, who were listening to Tamogami’s speech,  got angry at Pariseau’s rude words against Tamogami. 

I understand why these Japanese got angry with Pariseau. But I was a little disappointed at behaviors of these Japanese to shout furiously at this Canadian.  They should understand that this Canadian said rude words to Tamogami deliberately as a provocation and they responded to his provocation as he had expected.  We Japanese should understand that over 9 out of 10 westerners living in Japan have the same ideas about Yasukuni issue or Tamogami’s controversial essay as this Canadian.  Pierre Pariseau has written negative articles about Yasukuni Shrine for ‘The Japan Times’ two or three times.  The people who got angry with Pierre Pariseau should recognize almost westerners, especially the Allies’(America, Britain, Australia and so on.) people have stereotype that they Allies fought against inhuman Fascism states 65 years ago and liberated the people from it.  Therefore, if the person who denies or argues against the Allies’ historical perspective appears in front of them, they routinely try to label him/her as historical revisionist like Pavlov’s conditioned reflex. The word ‘Uyoku (Right Wing) ‘ is the term applied in place of ‘historical revisionist’ in Japan by foreign press. Almost westerners who try to label him/her as historical revisionist or Uyoku don’t want to debate on history with him/her from the beginning.  So Pierre Pariseau intentionally had a shit-eating grin on his face after saying a rude word against Tamogami and this Canadian hurried away from Yasukuni Shrine. It is obvious that the goal of this Canadian was only provocation against the Japanese intending to make them angry.

Actually, I too had the similar stereotype about Yasukuni Shrine to Pierre Pariseau until just a few years ago. It was 6 years ago that I visited Yasukuni Shrine for the first time.  Before visiting Yasukuni’s Yushukan (military and war museum),  I too thought that Yasukuni was Militarist Shrine.  I had a lot of negative image of Yauskuni such as black vehicles right-wing campaigners making poisonous and intense noises.  However,  I entered Yushukan and stood in front of over 6000 portraits who died in the war,  and as I read each and every one of farewell notes that so many people’s left,  I found ‘the true human dignity’ in farewell notes and understood what they died for.

What do you think they died for? I suppose you will answer “For the Emperor (Tenno)!” if you have the above-mentioned stereotype.  There are so many farewell notes to their families. These farewell notes speak to you why they fought at the risk of their lives and what they desperately tried to protect  They had things that are worth risking their lives! They had things that are worth giving their lives! Their wives,  their daughters,  their sons,  their mothers and their hometowns.  Even if they shouted,  “Tenno Heika Banzai! and died at the front,  their hearts were always with their families until the last moment of their lives.  More important for us,  these farewell notes speak to us that they entrusted Japan to future generations and died. Who are future generations that they entrusted ‘Japan’ to?  Naturally, we can never ignore the last wishes of the people who sacrificed their lives for Japan.  However,  if the people who died for Japan in the war see the reality of today’s Japan,  if they see the emotionally-disturbed society such as children kill their parents or corrupt politicians get hooked on women and money,  I’m sure they would be disappointed and lament over today’s Japan.  It is consequence of 65 years that the Japanese people have been turning their back on Yasukuni Shrine since the end of the war.  I realized I had been thankless Japanese when I read farewell notes at Yasukuni.

As you may know,  it has become controversial whether voting rights should be given to permanent foreign residents or not in Japan’s political world.  I would like to propose that the Japanese government should give voting rights to 2,466,532 people who are enshrined as ‘spirits of the war dead’ at Yasukuni first,  prior to giving voting rights to foreign residents who came to Japan by their own self-interest.  We must never forget that 2,466,532 people died for Japan and entrusted Japan’s future to us who live in the present.  The 65th anniversary of the end of the Greater East Asia war will come soon.

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Yasukuni Shrine – 1
Yasukuni Shrine – 2
靖国神社-彼らは何のために死んだのか?

 

 

Comments»

1. MB - August 15, 2010

I understand that you get many harrassing comments on this blog, but I want to say calmly that the kinds of views you’re advocating here are counterproductive.

Yasukuni’s view of the war, outlined on its website, clearly contradicts the conensus of the vast majority of historians around the world about WWII. Furthermore, as we’ve seen this year, it exists as a means for Japan to send contradictory messages on 8/15 when the government is attempting to apologize-something which is urged by most of the international community.

If the Japanese government and Yasukuni were willing to adopt an internationally acceptable view of history and make clear apologies, then there would be no political controversy, and families of these soldiers who died in WWII might be able to honor their memories in peace.

Continuing on this path gives the impression that you are selfishly abusing the memories of the war dead and their descedents in order to stir up trouble and gain attention for yourself.

2. hendrik - October 16, 2010

Those war criminals were the aggressor , they were not defending their country . This is the most biased blog ever .
no wonder 日本人の女の子が糞を食べる

3. J - February 7, 2011

To die for their families, they killed other family members. Such as babies, women, children, and non-japanese soldiers who try protect their dears.

4. J - February 7, 2011

By the way, the Canadian was not so rude. It was a straightforward question. The Japanese were rude all throughout the incidence.
Japanese culture is seriously sick. Pathologically hypocritical.

5. 日本老年人 - March 22, 2011

见怪不怪:日本人的“淡定”是一种“无奈”的表现
世界军事网 2011-03-16 21:46:26

  诚言,日本人在受到了强震袭击后的表现确实有些可圈可点,这从日本人的表情上就可以看出来。可这真的是日本国民素质的体现吗?这真的是训练有素的结果吗?恐怕也不尽然,日本人表现出来的是一种麻木,更多的是一种无奈。

  日本人在面临强震带来的巨大伤害面前,是表现出了临危不惧的淡定,可日本人的防灾救灾能力却是与其长期训练有素不相符。

  首先,对强震后大海啸有很长的预警时间,而这次地震的损害也主要是由海啸强起的。可日本政府和国民的淡定,使得本应当避免的重大人员伤害没有避免。特别令人不解的是,日本的先进战机就那么整齐的摆放在机场上,在海啸来临之前,是完全可以转移到安全地带的,可日本人并没有这么作,好像是在特意等待大海啸的“检阅”或者称之为“检验”。

  其次,在核电问题上日本人做得更是离谱,最基本的应急措施都没有,抢修是走一步看一步,被核电危机牵着走,一直是在堵窟窿。其防化部队居然到最后时刻才派往核电厂,好像是在保密这支部队。而防化部队到了现场后,竟然说没有经验,表现得手足无措,还要在核电厂的专家指导下工作,这样的准备真的是令人不解。还有就是昨日日方公开了东电公司在近20年来,一直没有对核电厂进行有效的检修维护,同时还一直在造假数据欺骗政府和民众。这样的事情发生一向最为严谨的日本,简直是不可思议。

  还有就是在救援上也表现得很无力。自认为经过海啸的袭击很难有生存的希望,所以根本没想着尽最大努力去救可能的生存者。可昨日不还是从废墟中救出了两位幸存者吗?日本人从小就进行灾难训练,日本人理应做好随时应对突发事件的可能准备,也就是说战略物资应当准备得相当充分,要知道日本是一个相当发达富裕的国家,这一点是有能力和必须做到的事情,可灾后缺水、缺食物、缺电、缺通讯的问题却非常的突出,这日本人都是怎么训练和防灾的?真令人不能理解。

  灾后的日本人表现出来的淡定,说白了是紧张不起来,表现得好像是司空见怪的事情。我曾在《日本人淡定得有些麻木了》一文中认为日本人是麻木了,可仔细想来,并不全是如此。日本人虽然表现出了麻木的一面,可如今看来,日本人更多的是表现出一种“无奈”。

  一、日本处于地震高发地带,受到强震打击是早晚的事情。因此,在日本人的心里面恐怕早就已经有了思想准备了,所以也就见怪不怪了。

  二、正因为日本是处于地震的高发带上,日本人从小就进行着灾难训练和灾难教育。在日本人的内心深处恐怕已经早就有了大灾难的影像,可这又是没有办法阻止的事情,日本人也只能是听之任之、无奈的接受了。

  三、日本是一个狭小的岛国,一处受灾就是全日本受灾,躲无处躲、藏无处藏,只能祈求上帝的保佑了,也只能是无奈的忍受了。

  四、日本得罪的国家太多,日本人受灾虽然从人性方面外界都存有同情之心,可是日本人心里也清楚,将会有很多的“外人”看日本的“笑话”。为了不让外人看“热闹”,日本人绝不能表现出一副可怜相。虽然我这话可能有些过(毕竟中国也摆脱不了自然的灾害,可这种心里在很多人心中都是有的),这恐怕也是事实。

  五、日本虽然是一个经济科技强国,但日本毕竟是一个国土狭小的小国家,又曾经是一个侵略成性的帝国,这样国家的人是最怕人家瞧不起的,所以必须表现出淡定的一面。

  六、在核危机问题上,日本人表现得相当的淡定,这是因为日本人心中有苦说不出。一个唯一受到过核打击的国家,却偏偏喜欢上了核能。最清楚核危害的日本人,理应远离“核”这个字,可日本人对核的研究和利用却很深入。早就有传言说日本人早就做好了生产核武器的准备,如果需要日本人很快就能生产出核武器,目前也是有人怀疑日本的核电厂里是否有“核秘密”。日本受到核危机的威胁,也只能是打掉了牙齿往自己肚子里咽,心中有苦也是说不出来的。不应当选择核能而选择了核能,经受核危机也是无奈的事情,也就必须保持淡定。

  总之,表面上日本早就做好了灾难教育和灾难准备,在防灾救灾方面理应做得更好,可日本人并没有表现出训练有素和准备充分的一面,这与实际并不相符。在重大灾难面前,日本人只是表现出了淡定,并没有表现出紧迫感,只是被动消极的对待。这不是真正的淡定,这只能说是一种“麻木和无奈”。

K - April 6, 2011

How about writing in English?
Japanese people don’t know that you should probably
use English in this website?

6. Zazza - March 23, 2011

Yasukuni Shrine is a monument for jingoism and religious fanaticism. People listed there died and killed for a man they thought was a god.

Saki - March 29, 2011

There is no god in Japan.
We just believed our victory and keep nation.

Zazza - April 2, 2011

No god in Japan, except the millions of deities all around the country which are still worshipped today.

7. h. - April 7, 2011

wtf. i hate jap.

8. 金美齢ファンクラブ - April 9, 2011

転載
金美齢ファンクラブ

老天有眼!最好在东京呵!
やっぱ神様はいるな!東京に地震来いよ!

地震了?好吧,我承认我笑了
地震だ?うん、笑ったよ。認めるw
⋯⋯
来个12级。把它给我震平了
マグニチュード12くらい来いよな。

祝贺祝贺。让海啸去得更猛一些吧
祝いだ、祝い。デカい津波も来るといいな。

今天是个好日子
今日はいい日だな。

今年听到的最棒的好消息了
今年に入って最高のニュース。

是个好消失,死点人更好,死绝了更爽
確かにいいニュースだ。死者が出ればいいな。絶滅したらもっといいけど。

7.2级都没有伤亡报告和财产损失???失望啊
M7.2で死傷者も何のダメージも無いだと??失望したぜ。

我是不是太坏了?为什么我老是希望日本岛被水淹没了?
オレって悪いヤツかな?いつも日本が沈没したらいいと思ってるんだが。
http://mantou.at.webry.info/201103/article_3.html

9. 金美齢ファンクラブ - April 9, 2011

金美齢ファンクラブ

自民党はホリエモンを選挙に担ぎだし、応援したのですから、どうにもおかしな話です。
この人が当選しなくて良かったと本当に思います。
Takujさん、ご覧になった番組覚えていますか?
ユーチューブで見られるかな?見てみたいです、青山氏の顔。笑

【必見】マスコミが必死に隠す事実を知らせる為に

【必見】マスコミが必死に隠す事実を知らせる為に
http://www.youtube.com
▲拡散動画▲ http://www.nicovideo.jp/watch/sm7498589 ★ミコスマ http://mikosuma.blog.shinobi.jp/ ⇒ビラ配り用PDF http://mikosuma.blog.shinobi.jp/Entry/47/ ⇒とっておき動画

10. Anonymous - April 10, 2011

What i dont understand is how come Japanese and Germanse are taking so different attitude on what they did in WWII. Is it juz ethnical and cultural difference? Is it cuz of political puppetiers? Or are they so dumb to know what is wrong?

Saki - April 10, 2011

What German did is holocoust which mean massacre for jews.
but there is no proof nanking massacre still now.
we don’t need to behave like claimed for Chinese

11. ああ - April 29, 2011

日本辱华谣言背后的阴谋
作者:毛峰,从事新闻采访报道工作20余年,现任《亚洲周刊》东京支局支局长

日本地震及核灾以来,网上出现匿名污蔑华人趁火打劫的谣言,也有日本媒体企图製作在日华人抢劫、强姦的片子,高酬聘请的旅日作家李小牧发现后坚拒合作。

日本大地震及福岛核事故,是一场复合式巨大灾难,背后竟在中日两国间震盪出一些流言蜚语。值得关注的是,一些流言中的谣言居心叵测,试图叠加出更多的「次伤害」,甚至企图再版「歷史阴谋」。谣言的第一受害者就是真相,其次是国民感情。在中国互联网上,有个别网民对日本遭受巨灾幸灾乐祸,也有传言称日本强震是由於暗中进行「核试验」造成,编造天方夜谭式的内情。在日本的微博及推特等网络上,也同样出现了种种流言蜚语。「在仙台市三条中学避难所里,中国人為所欲為,赶走取暖炉前的高龄老人。这是来自我祖父的SOS(求救)」,「半夜,有说外国话的几个男子进入店中,黎明时发现店里的商品都被偷走了。我当时怕极了,只能躲起来」。更有居心叵测的传言称「在地震现场不断有朝鲜人和中国人在进行盗窃、放火和强姦」,「应该把所有在日中国人都赶回去,并禁止他们再度来日」。

如果说这些在互联网上匿名发布的留言属於阳谋的话,那日本一家电视台及一家週刊杂誌试图利用撰写《歌舞伎町案内人》的李小牧来「编导」在日华人在地震现场进行盗窃、放火、强姦的内情,则无疑暗藏著阴谋。

李小牧告诉亚洲週刊,在震灾后的四月初,日本一家全国性电视台以及一家週刊杂誌社希望藉李小牧在中日两国的知名度,安排其到震灾区的宫城县、岩手县等地进行「採访」,并支付其高额取材协作费。在临行「採访」前,这两家媒体拿出了「採访计划」,要求李小牧能从在日中国人的立场,亲身述说「在日中国人是如何趁灾害之际进行盗窃等犯罪活动的情况」。李小牧断然拒绝了这一精心策划的「採访」,结果李小牧自掏腰包,自找旅店,独自一人前往灾区进行了為期十天的独立採访,留下了一份难能可贵的独立採访笔记。

关东地震阴魂不散

歷史的惨痛同样拒绝遗忘。八十八年前日本关东大地震中藉谣言大肆屠杀在日朝鲜人及中国人的悲惨史实再度警示人们:「歷史阴谋」的阴魂不散。一九二三年九月一日正午,一场里氏七点九级大地震席捲关东地区,从东京到横滨,十万餘间房屋顷刻轰然倒塌,数以百计的熊熊火灾吞噬了数万民居,停泊在东京湾沿岸的八千多艘船隻沉没。关东大地震造成了九万多人死亡,四万多人失踪,十多万人负伤。為了转移政府执政危机,地震当天深夜,种种谣传开始瀰漫於关东地区:「朝鲜人暴动啦,到处在放火」,「朝鲜人在水井中投毒、在抢劫、强姦」。

阴谋谣言產生了近乎疯狂的杀伤力,最终导致有六千多名在日朝鲜人惨遭杀害,也有七百多名在日中国人因此遇害,其中百分之九十是温州人。在东京大岛町四丁目的华人聚居地,九月三日就有二百名华工惨遭杀害。当时在日本的中国工人领袖王希元也在此间被日本军警秘密杀害。这些成為关东大地震中的一个歷史惨案,令人深思。

12. fyou - April 14, 2012

A nice place to burn down.

Fuck you nips. Go join your ancestors in hell.

13. _____ - April 14, 2012

They died for being brainwashed zombies who sucked the emperor’s dick. They died in vain.

Hahaha.

14. Mark - June 7, 2013

I am not making excuses for the Japanese, because I believe that, in general- not on rare occassions, the Japanese acted like wild animals- in some cases worse. I think there are probably two reasons for this- firstly, the Japanese believed the lives of others to be of little value because they believed that the Japanese were a divine race. Secondly, the commanders took little action to stop the individual soldiers and prevent atrocities- atrocities were committed by every nation, but they become widespread when it is condoned or encouraged by leaders. Thirdly, The Japanese were, to some extent, caged animals in a strict conformist close-knit society, and when they were let off the leash, the ran like a domestic dog who has gotten into a chicken house, killing randomly and viciously for entertainment.

After ten years in Japan, I sincerely believe that there are many great Japanese people, but in general, I believe that all of the above characteristics would immediately present themselves again if there was another war, and once again, following the war, the Japanese would deny any wrongdoing.

15. Arif G. Moinuddin - November 30, 2013

I don’t see what all this controversy about the Yasukuni shrine is about, and the HUGE amount of controversy that goes when a Japanese leader visits it. it is a place for Japan to honor its war dead. There is nothing wrong with that. WHy do people make such a big deal out of it?

Look at West Point Cemetery and Vietnam war memorial. West Point Cemetery hosts the graves of people like General Custer who dubbed himself as an “Indian Hunter”- meaning to say he prided himself in killing Native Americans. And he is honored. But nobody complains.

Nobody complains when a US leader visits the Vietnam war memorial either….not considering the Vietnam war memorial in DC honors people who were napalming villages, and enforcing US colonial policy on an unwilling population.

But nobody complaints because the West Point Cemetery and the Vietnam memorial is a place to honor America’s war dead. Japan surely deserves such a place too. It is incredible- the amount of double standard “apologists” and “democracy lovers” have.


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